Saturday, March 26, 2016

Working While Chronically Ill

Balancing employment and health is a challenging experience. The demands of a job and the toll of stress and exertion upon a chronically ill body is a balancing act not to be taken lightly. With proper care, the right circumstances, and a bit of luck it can be achieved.

Although my pediatric doctor adamantly believed I would qualify for disability due to my health, I was determined to make my own career. I've been fortunate to be able to maintain full time employment for the last 7 years although there are times that I seriously worry about my ability to continue working. I've learned a lot about the importance of self-care during my career thus far in order to maintain my employment status. My parents instilled upon me a strong work ethic. Combine this dedication to my work with my own hard-headedness and determination and a concoction is created for increased stress and susceptibility to illness.

During my first year of full time employment I experienced first hand the serious threat stress places upon the body. I was over-worked and still learning how to handle working 40+ hours a week while maintaining my own health. My body could only withstand the stress for so long. After about 6 months my health began to suffer and I was experiencing flare ups on an almost daily basis. I was forced to quit my job. I took a month to find another job during which time I recovered my health and have been able to work ever since after learning lessons in self-care.

I still struggle with managing my own self-care as I often accept additional responsibilities for a temporary period or insist upon working just a bit longer even when I am ill. I've learned that these behaviors place extraordinary stress upon myself physically and mentally and often result in a flare up. Therefore maintaining my usual responsibilities and taking time off when necessary are absolutely essential for my well-being.

I've learned to pace myself in my work. There are days when I am able to work 10 hours for the day and other days when I can only manage 4 hours. Instead of pushing myself past my breaking point, I must assess my health and my capability and balance it with my work load not only for the day but for the week before I recover during the weekend. If I need to work longer on a particular day, I've learned to lighten my load and increase my resting period on the day prior to my long work day.

For the past 4 months I have been battling anemia after a trial period without iron or B12 medication. I became so fatigued that I was hardly able to keep my eyes open past 11 am on average. I was experiencing multiple symptoms of iron and B12 deficiency and my daily functioning was greatly impaired. I began to worry about my ability to remain employed as my work performance was suffering and unacceptable in my eyes. I voiced my concerns to my managers and restarted my B12 medication on my own. I had to make a change before my functioning continued to diminish.

My employers are aware of my health issues and work with me to help me balance my health and my work. Working for an understanding employer has been key to my employment sustainability. I'm able to flex my time as needed, utilize intermittent Family Medical Leave of Absence, and continue my efforts to maintain a high work performance while monitoring my health status. My managers work with me on bad days and appreciate my good days. They have faith that I will complete my responsibilities, if not today then within a timely manner.

It takes a combination of effort and measures to maintain the best of health particularly when undergoing additional demands upon your body and health. Finding the correct combination for balance takes time and effort of trial and error. It's important to not compare your level of functioning to another as one person's balance set won't be the same balance set for another. It's vital for our well-being to find our own balance and not push ourselves past that balance in order to thrive with whatever endeavors we're pursuing.

Saturday, March 12, 2016

To the Broken Hearted

After disclosing about my own journey through broken heartedness and divorce while dealing with my chronic illness, I heard from several people who had gone through similar trials and it touched my heart.

Regardless of the type of relationship, those of us with a chronic illness are more vulnerable in our relationships than our healthier counterparts. We open ourselves in ways others aren't forced to expose. We are more at risk of losing ourselves as we learn to lean on another to help us through our health struggles and we begin to share our health experiences with another. When the relationship ends, regardless of reason, we are vulnerable as we regain our footing and independence.

This is dedicated to all those who are broken hearted and struggling.

Your soul has been ripped apart as you stare down at the tattered pieces of your heart.

The pain sears your soul leaving you tender, hurt, and confused.

All that you knew changed in an instant and you're left not knowing where to turn or what to do.

You fell into a spiral of lost control frantically grasping to regain your footing.

I've been where you are now. My soul was torched, my heart in pieces, and my spirit broken. I didn't know what to do. My sole remaining purpose was just to survive. My mind couldn't handle more than mere survival. I was trapped, suffocating in my heart break, desperately clawing at my own spiritual grave. Clawing for relief, for light, for healing.

One day my heart mended enough that the suffocation began to lessen bit by bit until one day I burst forth from my grave and found myself soaring with the strength of the eagles. A transformation was taking place but it could only occur after the flames of soul searing pain had burned long and hard until finally extinguishing themselves.

With a new found strength I realized I deserved better. A better state of mind, better days, a better life. I accepted that I deserved happiness and that I could create my own happiness by being true to myself. I learned to accept myself, to do things for myself, and to follow my heart. I was only able to learn these lessons though after I felt my pain and survived it. I was stronger and better for it.

Your days may be long and your nights hard. Your tender heart vulnerable in its current state. But you will not remain here. You will burst forth from the flames that presently surround you. You will survive and be better for your heartache. Let yourself feel the pain so that you may process the pain. Take the time you need for self-healing and self-loving. Make this part of your daily ritual for self-care.

This is your time, your life. No one can steal this grand moment in the making from you without your permission. Savor this moment, relish in your self-worth. You are worth it and so much more. You are not your heartache. You are a survivor with a story to tell and a life to create.